Trail - 95.7FM
Castlegar - 90.3FM
Grand Forks - 103.3FM
Creston - AM 1340
Nelson - 106.9FM
Crawford Bay - 101FM
New Denver - 93.5FM
Kaslo - 95.3FM
Nakusp - 103.1FM

November 18, 1994
New Age, Progressive Electronic, Prog-Rock, Art Rock

Album Review

Mike Oldfield's The Songs of Distant Earth was inspired by a book by science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke, who gave the album a ringing endorsement in the liner notes. Of course, the association between literature and music is something more felt than generally understood, and while Oldfield's recording was shot through with sound effects that seemed to relate to space travel (countdowns, etc.), it was less reminiscent of any writing than it was of earlier works by Oldfield. And though by 1996 Oldfield could make some claim to being the godfather not only of new age but of the recently popular version of it steeped in Celtic music (i.e., Enya), he remained grounded in progressive rock so that, with its recurrent backbeat and stately, but penetrating guitar solos, his music continued to seem closer to Pink Floyd than to Windham Hill.
William Ruhlmann, Rovi

Track Listing

  1. In the Beginning
  2. Let There Be Light
  3. Supernova
  4. Magellan
  5. First Landing
  6. Oceania
  7. Only Time Will Tell
  8. Prayer for the Earth
  9. Lament for Atlantis
  10. The Chamber
  11. Hibernaculum
  12. Tubular World
  13. The Shining Ones
  14. Crystal Clear
  15. The Sunken Forest
  16. Ascension
  17. A New Beginning
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